Archive for September 2015

Currently getting 400ms ping times to my wi-fi access point, and about 16k/second to my file server over my ‘150Mbps’ wi-fi connection. Plug in an Ethernet cable, and the ping is down to 0.25ms.

Remind me never to buy another laptop with Realtek wi-fi.

Bought one of these to get faster wi-fi, as the ISP wi-fi is only 2.4GHz 54Mbps (and rarely gets close to it). This means I can now use the ISP wi-fi as a ‘guest’ network that can’t access the other computers in the house, while the rest of us connect to the new router.

To avoid problems, I decided to use the same IP subnets on both routers. I assumed the router wouldn’t have any problem handling that, since it does NAT and both subnets are private. Oh, dear.

First time I plugged the Archer C7 into the ISP router, it went and got a DHCP address from the ISP router… and stopped working. No routing, no web page.

Turns out that it can’t handle having both WAN and LAN on overlapping subnets. Worse, when it does that, it resets its own IP address to the default 192.168.0.1, anyone using static IP configuration suddenly finds their gateway has vanished, and anyone trying to connect to the configured IP address finds it’s not there.

But it gets worse. You can’t even disconnect the WAN cable and reboot the router, because it PERMANENTLY changes the IP address back to the default. Before I realized what it was doing, I ended up resetting it to defaults and restoring the configuration backup I’d previously made (you did make a backup, right?)

Other than this peculiarity, which required me to change the IP address of pretty much every device on the LAN, and the fact that it routes private IP addresses in the first place, it seems to be working fine so far.

Spacesuit on barren landscape

Condemned cover

Finishing the first draft of the first book of a new SF adventure series. Should be out November or December, with any luck.

Lesbian Posed As Cancerous Latino Man, Accused of Sexual Assault With Strap On

So, I gave in a while ago, and replaced my Nexus 7 with an iPad Air 2. The Nexus was the second Android tablet, and the fourth Android device in the house, and it was pretty good while I used it. But I finally got fed up with a number of things.

1. Android’s security nightmare. The Nexus isn’t so bad, since Google ship updates themselves, but my Android phone had several security holes, and I’ve no idea which may or may not have been fixed, or which will ever be fixed, since they have to go through the manufacturer and phone company before they get to me. It’s still on Android 5.0, so who knows if there’ll be any more updates or whether it’s just been abandoned.
2. Android permissions. The ‘install or don’t’ permission model is completely and utterly broken, unless your goal is to let apps spy on your users. I’m heartily sick of every piece-of-crap app wanting every permission under the sun. Google even provided a more sensible permission model a few revisions back, then removed it. Maybe the next release will have one, maybe not. Google would rather rewrite the UI than implement one.
3. Rapid obsolescence. The Nexus was still on sale a year ago, and some sites are still selling it today. But seems like Google are going to abandon it with 5.1. Apple keep supporting old hardware until it’s no longer capable of running the latest OS.
4. Performance. The Nexus has several times the RAM and more CPU power than my girlfriend’s old iPad, yet it feels clunky in comparison. Java may have seemed a good idea for supporting lots of different devices, but it comes with some horrible performance problems.
5. Bugs. Some of the apps I use on a regular basis have become less and less usable with new Android releases, and one hasn’t even been updated since February. Those apps work fine on the iPad.
6. Storage. The Nexus has no SD card slot, and Google has made them useless, anyway. The apps I run that use a lot of space refuse to install on an SD card, and some that do allow you to install them there just crash if you try to run them. That’s not a great reason to switch to an iPad, because they don’t support SD cards at all, but I needed a device with more storage, so I’d have bought something else soon anyway.

So, I’ll keep the Nexus as a throwaway device when I’m travelling, when it won’t have anything particularly important on it. But, at home, I’ll be doing most tablety things on the iPad, instead.

Unless Google get their act together soon, they’re going to throw the mid-range of the mobile market to Microsoft, while Apple keep the high end.